Machu Picchu: an overview

7,000 feet above sea level and nestled on a small hilltop between the Andean Mountain Range, the majestic city soars above the Urabamba Valley below. The Incan built structure has been deemed the “Lost Cities”, unknown until its relatively recent discovery in 1911.

Archaeologists estimate that approximately 1200 people could have lived in the area, though many theorize it was most likely a retreat for Incan rulers. Due to it’s isolation from the rest of Peru, living in the area full time would require traveling great distances just to reach the nearest village.
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Ernesto “Che” Guevara talking about Machu Picchu

“A pure expression of the most powerful indigenous race in the Americas.” – Ernesto “Che” Guevara

Many people name the sacred power that some archeologic sites carry. For people who understand, you’d know I originate from Peru and people UN agency understand American state additional intimately would understand that i used to be born in Cuzco, Peru.
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Machu Picchu places: Inca Trail

The Inca path in Republic of Peru is one among the world’s most illustrious hiking trails. ranging from the Sacred valley of the Urubamba river and ending at the breathless ruins of Machu Picchu, the 45km path takes 3 to 5 days to finish. The path itself winds through a mix of high altitude mountain ranges (the Andes) and dense subtropic forest.

Hiking the Inca trail needs that you just be in comparatively sensible soundness. although the hike isn’t in itself extraordinarily troublesome, the altitude, that rises in more than 12000 feet can build it troublesome for the unprepared walker. As a rule of thumb, it’s typically counseled that payment two days in town is enough for acclimating yourself to the decrease in element levels.
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Machu Picchu attractions: Llama, alpaca and vicuna

The most protected sanctuary in Peru is Machu Picchu. That’s why your journey wouldn’t be complete until you see the varied animals that inhabit the world. One in every of the rather distinctive creatures you’ll see is that the alpaca. It’s very easy to mistake an alpaca for a llama.

Alpacas square measure usually smaller however the key distinction between the 2 lies within the quality of their wool. Alpaca fibres square measure terribly soft and heat creating their fleece a perfect alternative for covering material. They even have the widest sort of colours in their fleece with over twenty two. The Incans created use of their wool to make superbly plain-woven and colourful covering.
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Machu Picchu places: Temple of the Condor

The Temple of the Condor in Machu Picchu is a breathtaking example of Inca stonemasonry. A natural rock formation began to take shape millions of years ago and the Inca skillfully shaped the rock into the outspread wings of a condor in flight.

On the floor of the temple is a rock carved in the shape of the condor’s head and neck feathers, completing the figure of a three-dimensional bird. Historians speculate that the head of the condor was used as a sacrificial altar. Under the temple is a small cave that contained a mummy.
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Machu Picchu places: Intihuatana

The Intihuatana at Machu Picchu, known as the “hitching post of the sun” is a carved rock pillar whose four corners are oriented toward the four cardinal points. The Inca were accomplished astronomers, and used the angles of the pillar to predict the solstices. The sun exerted a crucial influence on the agriculture, and therefore the well-being of the whole society. It was considered the supreme natural god (a ceramic corn god gives evidence to the spiritual devotion of the natural world that was common to all pre-Inca cultures).
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Machu Picchu places: Central plaza

The Central Plaza of Machu Picchu is surrounded by roofless stone structures and steep terraces, with a lovely view of Huayna Picchu.

The plaza is the green island amid the Inca stone buildings that make up Machu Picchu, and travelers will often see llamas roaming through the grass and grazing.

The Central Plaza’s grassy field separates the Sacred Plaza and Intihuatana from the residential areas on the far side of the complex.
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Machu Picchu places: Sacred stone

Across the Central Plaza and at the far end of Machu Picchu is the Sacred Rock, an object common to most every Inca village. Before a village could be erected, a sacred stone must be dedicated to the site.

The Sacred Stone of Machu Picchu sits at the base of Huayna Picchu (little peak), from where you can take a one-hour climb to the top for another excellent view of the entire valley. Hikers can sign in at the Gatekeeper’s shack as proof they tackled the steep climb up Huayna Picchu.
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Machu Picchu places: Sacred Plaza

The view from Machu Picchu’s Sacred Plaza makes one appreciate the superb craftmenship of the Inca. Surrounding the plaza are the most important buildings of the city.

The Principal Temple is an example of excellent Inca stonemasonry, with its large stone blocks polished smooth and joined perfectly. The jumbling of the stones in one corner is due to the settling of the earth over the years, and not to any defect in construction.
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Machu Picchu places: Inside the Royal Tomb

Inside the Royal Tomb has been the site of numerous mummy excavations. Of more than 100 skeletal remains discovered here, 80% were women. This fact, among others, leads many historians to surmise that the area was inhabited primarily by high priests and chosen women.

The true purpose of Machu Picchu has never been conclusively determined. To the left of the royal tomb lies a series of 16 ceremonial baths, joined by one linked aqueduct system.
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Machu Picchu places: Royal tomb

Inside the Royal Tomb has been the site of numerous mummy excavations. Of more than 100 skeletal remains discovered here, 80% were women. This fact, among others, leads many historians to surmise that the area was inhabited primarily by high priests and chosen women.

The true purpose of Machu Picchu has never been conclusively determined. To the left of the royal tomb lies a series of 16 ceremonial baths, joined by one linked aqueduct system.
Continue reading…